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WE ARE BRUNN

Let’s Work Together

WELCOME

The Interpreters & Translators Association of Alabama (ITAA) is a professional nonprofit organization that promotes the profession of interpreting and translating in Alabama, educates the community on the importance of using qualified language professionals, and supports continuing education and networking opportunities for professional and aspiring interpreters and translators.

Membership in ITAA is open to anyone who is a practicing interpreter or translator, or those interested in learning about the profession or supporting language access in Alabama.

Welcome to

ITAA

DISCLAIMER

ITAA is not an agency for translation or interpretation services. Furthermore, ITAA assumes no responsibility for the content of any member’s listing regarding education, certification, experience, etc. Our members are solely responsible for the content of their individual directory listing.

BENEFITS OF JOINING ITAA

Opportunities

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Opportunities to serve on Committees and the Board of Directors

Support

02

Support the Interpreting and Translation professions and increase language access in Alabama

Listing

03

Individual listing on our website Member Directory

Networking

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Networking and mentoring opportunities

Discounts

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Reduced fees for local trainings and workshops

Email List

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Active email list including training opportunities and job postings

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

kenton blue w bowtie

Kenton Myers

President

Maria Baker

Maria Baker

Vice President

Elabeth D'Angelo

Elizabeth D'Angelo

Secretary

Luz Irene Reyes

Luz Irene Reyes

Treasurer

Ray Ables

Ray Ables

Member at Large

Eva Cabrera

Eva Cabrera

Member at Large

Who must provide language access?

Anyone receiving federal support, even indirectly, is required to provide language access. Moreover, Title VI applies to a recipient’s entire program or activity. This means all parts of a recipient’s is only partially funded through federal funds, Language access requirements are therefore relevant to a wide variety of programs, organizations and agencies.

Do I need to provide access to oral information/services?

Yes, if you provide information/services in English, you need to be sure that LEP individuals also have meaningful access to oral information/services. This is commonly done by using interpretation or by hiring multilingual employees.

In more concrete term, what must I do to comply?

Recipients of federal funding must take “reasonable steps” to ensure that LEP individuals have “meaningful access” to their activities and programs and activities. An agency provides meaningful access to its program when the language assistance provided is accurate, timely effective and it’s a no cost to the LEP individual. Each agency’s approach to overcoming language barriers will differ based on the population they serve, the type of service and the resources they have access to.

 

DOJ has developed a self assessment and planning tool to help agencies determine how to provide meaningful access to LEPs. This approach takes into account an agency’s mission, the population served from both a linguistic and cultural context, the establishing language access policies and plans.